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US Court of Appeals will hear Argentine case on assets disclosure

Wednesday, December 17th 2014 - 13:11 UTC
Full article 18 comments
Argentina attorneys have filed an appeal against Griesa’s ruling asking local banks for information on Argentina’s assets, which is known as “discovery.” Argentina attorneys have filed an appeal against Griesa’s ruling asking local banks for information on Argentina’s assets, which is known as “discovery.”

US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan this Wednesday morning will hear Argentina’s appeal against US Judge Thomas Griesa’s order to Argentine banks to provide information on the state’s assets.

 The hearing will take place at the 17th floor of the Court’s building in Foley Square at 10 am. Argentine and the holdout creditors' lawyers will have 15 minutes each before the judges.

Argentine attorneys from Cleary Gottlieb, have filed an appeal against Griesa’s September 13 ruling asking local banks for information on Argentina’s assets, which is known as “discovery.” The decision has already been analysed by the US Supreme Court in June 2014 but the lawyers say that there are several issues have not been solved yet.

Argentina’s lawyer Carmine Boccuzi stated that Griesa’s ruling is “simply harassment” and that the discovery requests “violate Vienna Conventions, Federal rulings and the Court’s precedent.

Categories: Economy, Politics, Argentina.

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  • yankeeboy

    Those conventions and Federal Ruling she's talking about don't apply because Arg waived Immunity/Sovereignty.
    My bet next year BCRA funds will be attachable
    They can seize non embassy property
    and Embassy bank accounts

    I can't wait

    Dec 17th, 2014 - 03:08 pm 0
  • Moderator

    Just 1 comment? Where is the rest of the bashing mob?

    Dec 17th, 2014 - 03:15 pm 0
  • Conqueror

    @2. Bashing? Why do say “bashing”? After all, raising US$82 billion by means of fraudulent bonds and then refusing to pay it back is quite normal, ISN'T IT? Well, it is for argieland. After all, argieland is doing so WELL, isn't it? Here's a thought. When your debts are so much that you can't afford to eat, it's not the right time to go out and promise to spend US$8 million. Will Russia ever get paid for its tugs? Or will argieland tell Russia that it will have to make do with US$2.4 million? Does Russia know? Russian bases? That'll get US attention. Remember Cuba? Still embargoed. US supports Falkland Islands?

    Wonder if argies have ever heard of honesty? Looking back over other debt restructurings, I see a common pattern. The debtor goes to the lender(s) and tells them it can't afford to pay. There are negotiations. The lender(s) decide what they will accept. From time to time there is an agreement that the debtor will pay more when/if the situation improves. WHERE has argieland followed this simple course of action? Where were the negotiations? How many debt restructurings have finished up in court? How many times has a country been cited for contempt of court? How many times has a debtor tried to get the whole international financial system altered to suit itself? Fortunately, argieland can't get the system changed in any way that the US will recognise. General Assembly resolutions are NON-BINDING. The US has the clout to ensure that financial activities in the US comply with US requirements. The US and its allies will benefit. Argieland will do what it does best. First, it will fail. Then it will scream that it is a victim. And who will care?

    Dec 17th, 2014 - 04:15 pm 0
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