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FARC vows to lay down arms and to reinvent itself as a political party

Monday, February 9th 2015 - 17:41 UTC
Full article 9 comments
Spokesperson Santich said FARC hopes to see the group's “transformation into a political movement that can work to bring about structural change” Spokesperson Santich said FARC hopes to see the group's “transformation into a political movement that can work to bring about structural change”
Negotiations between resumed last week in Havana after a year-end break, as rebels and the Bogota government try to end the half-century old insurgency. Negotiations between resumed last week in Havana after a year-end break, as rebels and the Bogota government try to end the half-century old insurgency.

Colombian FARC guerrillas on Saturday vowed to lay down their weapons and reinvent themselves as a political party, if the Colombian government follows through with the reforms under discussion in peace talks.

 The rebel group, Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, “is committed to ensuring that the armed hostilities of the past don't get recur,” one of its negotiators Jesus Santrich said in a statement read to the media at the start of another day of talks.

Among the changes the FARC hopes to see, Santrich said, is the group's “transformation into a political movement that can work to bring about structural change” in Colombia.

The FARC as a political party would also endeavor to bring about reparations for victims, and to preserve “the historical truth” about the country's decades-old civil conflict, he said.

Negotiations between the two sides resumed this week in Havana after a year-end break, as rebels and the Bogota government try to end the half-century old insurgency.

Talks so far have yet to resolve key issues including disarmament and how any agreement should be ratified.

The FARC said in its statement that it also is looking for reform of the government's position on communism, overhaul of the armed forces, greater protection of minority rights, and other changes.

The government's delegation, led by Humberto de la Calle, has been meeting with negotiators from the rebel group since November 2012.

So far, the two sides have agreed on three of the six points of the agenda to end the conflict, which is estimated to have claimed the lives of more than 220,000 people.

Categories: Politics, Latin America.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Chicureo

    Historically terrorist groups have renounced violence, but my advice is to kill them all. (I know, not politically correct .)

    Feb 09th, 2015 - 06:15 pm 0
  • Briton

    Send in the mighty CFK, she will sort them out...

    Feb 09th, 2015 - 08:36 pm 0
  • ilsen

    @ 1
    I understand your feelings, but in this case, in won't work. It just breeds more violence. From both sides.

    “So far, the two sides have agreed on three of the six points of the agenda to end the conflict, which is estimated to have claimed the lives of more than 220,000 people.””

    220,000 people. How much more blood do you want to see? Another 30 years of this?
    I hope this is the beginning of a resolution, a peaceful outcome for all. Colombia has massive potential, with Chile they could lead the continient into a much more positive future. But this needs to be resolved, to continue to keep fighting these pointless battles without end, well, that is madness.
    It is possible to solve these issues, mot perfectly, but it is possible.

    Feb 10th, 2015 - 02:21 am 0
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