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Montevideo, December 4th 2021 - 02:31 UTC

 

 

Argentina and Brazil admit trade disagreements between Mercosur main partners

Thursday, February 12th 2015 - 20:57 UTC
Full article 23 comments
Timerman acknowledged trade between the two countries needs some “fine-tuning”, but for Argentina Brazil is its “most strategic partner.” Timerman acknowledged trade between the two countries needs some “fine-tuning”, but for Argentina Brazil is its “most strategic partner.”
From Brazil Development Minister Armando Monteiro admitted “discomfort” with Argentina because of the “steeper controls on imports through affidavits” From Brazil Development Minister Armando Monteiro admitted “discomfort” with Argentina because of the “steeper controls on imports through affidavits”

Argentina and Brazil failed to reach an agreement to help unlock the ongoing tension between the two key Mercosur allies over bilateral trade. Argentina's Hector Timerman and his counterpart Mauro Vieira met in Buenos Aires to try and ease Brazil’s growing concerns about restrictions on the flow of goods, but any decisions were pushed forward to an undetermined date.

 Timerman acknowledged that trade between the two countries needs some “fine-tuning”, although he was full of warm words for the neighboring country, saying Argentina considered Brazil its “most strategic partner.”

Despite these lofty words, the two sides were only able to agree to a “meeting in the next few weeks at deputy-ministerial level to deal with the economic issues surrounding our relationship.”

Sources close to the meeting said the now-infamous Argentine (sworn declaration) DJAI import permit was the main stumbling-block of the meeting.

During the meeting, Timerman was joined by some of the country’s top economic officials, including Economy Minister Axel Kicillof, Federal Planning Minister Julio De Vido, Cabinet Chief Jorge Capitanich and Industry Minister Debora Giorgi.

Before the trip, Brazil’s Development Minister Armando Monteiro said there’s “discomfort” with Argentina because of the “steeper controls on imports through affidavits” and the “difficulties buying foreign currency.”

Brazil’s concerns were backed by the Argentine Chamber of Commerce (CAC), which issued a report stating that trade within Mercosur was down 10.6% in the first three quarters of 2014.

The report highlighted Argentina’s outsized role in that decline, pointing that the country’s activity inside the trade bloc had declined 16.3% in the third quarter of 2014. According to the CAC, this meant that the trade bloc was “losing relevance,” failing to accomplish its stated goal of increasing regional trade.

Imports from Brazil to Argentina decreased 25% last year, according to the INDEC statistics bureau.

Brazil’s concern over securing exports to Argentina came amid a continued decline of the value of its currency, as the Real hit a new record-low, falling to 2.87 Reais to the dollar, its weakest position in more than 10 years.

Ongoing concerns about the deterioration of Brazil’s economy, combined with expectations of higher US interest rates, have contributed to the Real’s roughly seven percent fall since the beginning of February.

In reply to concerns about the increased ties with China leading to a reduced focus on the Mercosur trade bloc, both Foreign ministers agreed this was not the case.

“A strategic relationship with Argentina doesn’t exclude other countries,” Vieira said. “The relationship with China is open and intense in all countries in the region.”

China’s growing role in Mercosur countries was instead seen as another factor tying its members together. “I don’t think the deal with China goes against the Mercosur,” Timerman said, “it actually strengthens it.”

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Chicureo

    No!!!
    Not possible! Mercosour is one big happy family. Especially since the vibrant economy of Venezuela has been added along with complete free trade between the countries...
    Ask Paraguay what they think...
    It's soooo sad that Chile, Peru, Colombia and Mexico embraced free trade agreements. Look at the sad state their struggling economies are experiencing due to it.
    If only those Falkland pirates would leave the sacred Las Malvinas, everything would be sooooooo much better for Latin America...

    Feb 12th, 2015 - 10:01 pm 0
  • Brasileiro

    It is true that Mexico is experiencing a serious financial crisis? I read an article in “El Economista” and I was amazed.

    I always felt sorry Mexico. Very poor country that serves as cheap labor for US. GDP can even be significant, but it is almost all in the hands of US companies.

    Washington Consensus Effects!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lY5US3z5Gas

    Feb 12th, 2015 - 11:01 pm 0
  • Captain Poppy

    Don't allow you ignorance of Mexico get in the way of you stupid ramblings. The majority of big business in Mexico are Mexican. Do a little research if you get get your head out of your ass hole long enough to read. 4 of the 10 largest are owned by one Mexican man......any idea who?

    Feb 13th, 2015 - 12:01 am 0
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