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Macri calls for sovereignty dialogue on Falklands in his speech to UN General Assembly

Wednesday, September 21st 2016 - 08:27 UTC
Full article 36 comments

In his first speech as head of state before the United Nations General Assembly, Argentine President Mauricio Macri called on the United Kingdom to find “an amicable solution” through dialogue to the long-standing dispute over the Falklands/Malvinas Islands sovereignty.. Read full article

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  • Roger Lorton

    Same old, same old......

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 09:13 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Brit Bob

    Only Argentina is in dispute.

    Next he'll be talking about the usurpation and the many UN resolutions:
    https://www.academia.edu/21721198/Falklands_1833_Usurpation_and_UN_Resolutions

    One day an Argentinean politician will have to tell the truth about that mythical Malvinas claim - one of the greatest lies of the century.

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 09:19 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Terence Hill

    “Malvinas sovereignty claim is standing and non negotiable” is not a dialogue. Originally Argentina declined, refusing to acknowledge two diplomatic protests. Therefore, by their 'silence' acknowledging the legitimacy of the British position. Broke-off dialogue prior to their attempted usurpation in '82. Then withdrew from agreements and dialogue in the late nineties. I don't claim to comprehend all the possible connotations involved, but it is difficult to see what possible benefit there is for the UK. Given the historical narrative of Argentina in the past. As the US chargé d'affaires Francis Baylies wrote about Argentina in 1832
    “...The revolutions of these people are seditious; their knowledge. chicanery and trickery; their patriotism, their liberty, a farce... ”
    Baylies held that the US should sign no treaty ...for we would abide by it, and they would consider the violation no greater offense than a lie told by a schoolboy...”
    http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/argentina/rosas.pdf
    To the present day as constantly defrauding and reneging on every contract or treaty. But what else can be expected of a nation that aspires to be dishonest vis-à-vis viveza criolla.

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 10:56 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • ChrisR

    Oh dear, he's going the way of TMBOA.

    And that turned out well, NOT.

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 11:28 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • brasherboot

    UK armed forces say “f Off”

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 11:47 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • The Major

    The difference in values between Argentina and the UK.
    While Prime Minister May talks about World affairs. President Macri talks about the Falklands.
    One would have thought that Macri would talk more about how the world can help Argentina recover from its self induced hardships than to recover something Argentina the modern day colonists never had.

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 01:37 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • golfcronie

    Argentina and UK dialog
    Argentina: It is written into our constitution that the Malvinas are ours.
    UK : Where are these mythical Malvinas?
    Argentina: You know them as the FALKLAND ISLANDS.
    UK:Why didn't you say the FALKLANDS?
    Argentina: Because to us they are the Malvinas?
    UK: Why, you have never owned the FALKLANDS
    Argentina: We never said we owned the FALKLANDS, we owned the Malvinas.
    UK : We are not getting anywhere , best speak to the FALKLANDERS.
    Argentina: We can't do that as it would recognise the existence of the FALKLANDERS
    And so it goes on.

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 02:56 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Zaphod102

    Macri got a lot of criticism from the Malvinistas in Argentina for being too soft in his speech and they suspect a hidden agenda of kicking the argument into the long grass as a prelude to abandoning their (baseless) claim.

    However, a year ago CFK didn't mention the Falklands at all in her speech and they didn't get their knickers in a twist over that! :-D

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 05:58 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Briton

    What would I do,,,,,

    if I had my way,
    first of I would get British lawyers to see if Britain had any claim what so ever no matter how small of a claim to any bit of ARGENTINA,

    Then I would lodge this claim at the UN ,
    just for the bloody sheer hell of it.

    if I could..

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 06:39 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Britworker

    They always have to over egg the pudding don't they. Not happy with just calling them talks and dialogue, he had to call them sovereignty talks.

    All the right week newspapers have jumped on this now on the UK and they probably scuppered the whole thing. You can always rely on Argentina to mess things up.

    Sep 21st, 2016 - 06:59 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Hektor

    I will keep my answer very brief and just concentrate on the main points and issues. I just do not have the time for a more expansive response. Maybe tomorrow, I might have more time. However, I wanted to write something, today.

    A lot of people in this forum have been fed a fiction story that Argentina and the Falklands and it is being regurgitated time and time again. The debate regarding historical rights had been settled over 70 years ago and Argentina has them. Period. Not even David Cameron cited Britain’s “historical rights” when he staunchly defended the Kelpers right of self-determination.

    Let’s stop this non-sense and talk about the present day situation and what to do about it. The UK after Brexit is looking for new markets outside the EU. From 1825 to WWII, Great Britain was Argentina’ main trading partner. After Great Britain joined the EU, the trade declined dramatically. Great Britain is trying to reestablish its old links with Argentina and so are we in respect to England. We prospered as a nation under the British sphere of influence. After the US replaced Britain, we got screwed. The stumbling block is the Malvinas dispute.

    I am not part of the Argentine government nor do I represent any political faction. Therefore, I can talk frankly. Here is the real present day situation. Argentina has the historical rights and you have possession of the Islands. Period. We are not stupid. We know very well that are not getting the Falklands back. On the other hand, we do not want them for many reasons. All we are interested is in reestablishing economic links and ties with Great Britain and reaching a comprehensive agreement or treaty with the UK regarding the South Atlantic and the Antarctica. In order to do so we have to put everything on the table including our claim to the Falklands. These negotiations are between Argentina and the UK, only.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 03:51 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • James Marshall

    @11...We wait with bated breath as to your explanation of Argentina's Historic Rights that were settled over 70 years ago...Over to you Hektor Sockpuppet.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 06:24 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • lsolde

    Wrong, Hektor.
    The Falklands were NEVER yours.
    You think that you can wear us down, but you can't.
    You don't own Antarctica either.
    P.S. l am interested in your “proof” that you own South Georgia, as no Argentine has ever lived there.
    So there you have it, Hektor.
    Prove it.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 09:59 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Evil Colonialist Pirate

    His rubber-faced predecessor and her Gollum-like sidekick would have probably claimed that during their meeting Theresa May expressed strong support for Argentine claims to the “Malvinas”.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 11:34 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • gordo01

    @11 Hector

    “A lot of people in this forum have been fed a fiction story that Argentina and the Falklands and it is being regurgitated time and time again. The debate regarding historical rights had been settled over 70 years ago and Argentina has them. Period. Not even David Cameron cited Britain’s “historical rights” when he staunchly defended the Kelpers right of self-determination.” More “hectoring” as this statement is just plain “caca de toro”! ARGENTINA HAS NEVER POSSESSED NOR EXERCISED SOVEREIGNTY OVER THE FALKLANDS ARCHIPELAGO AND YOU SEEM UNABLE TO PRODUCE PROOF OF YOUR STATEMENTS.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 01:15 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Briton

    Hektor
    you obviously have an interest here, you obviously have your reasons as to why you should have the islands,

    well,
    why don't you tell US why YOU think they belong to you [Argentina ]
    in your own words then,

    we are indeed waiting ?

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 01:18 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • darragh

    @11 Hektor

    Please explain what you mean by “The debate regarding historical rights had been settled over 70 years ago and Argentina has them” as to me that seems to be gibberish.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 02:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Conqueror

    @9. Sounds complicated and too expensive in legal fees to me.

    But I do have a solution. Argieland voluntarily relinquishes sovereignty over the territory it currently occupies. And humbly asks whether it can become part of the British Empire.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 06:17 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Briton

    Sounds good,
    but we would have to remove all that corruption down there.

    Sep 22nd, 2016 - 07:26 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Hektor

    “Wrong, Hektor.
    The Falklands were NEVER yours.
    You think that you can wear us down, but you can't.
    You don't own Antarctica either.
    P.S. l am interested in your “proof” that you own South Georgia, as no Argentine has ever lived there.
    So there you have it, Hektor.
    Prove it.”

    Isolde:

    What are you talking about? Let me answer you point by point. All I said that Argentina had the historical rights to the Falklands. Who was talking about historical rights to the Georgias and Antarctica?

    After the last Spanish Governor to the Falklands, Argentina appointed Luis Vernet as the Governor of the Malvinas (Falklands.) In 10 June 1929, Luis Vernet together with 50 families, raised the Argentine flag in the Falklands

    I also tried to convey that historical rights plus $2.00 will get you a cup of coffee. It is all meaningless if you do not have possession of the Islands. This is something that got lost in this forum. Possession is everything, in the real world, and we do not have it.

    The Antarctic is a completely different story. No country owns it. It is under the Antarctic Treaty. Argentina is one of the original signatories of the treaty and that includes Great Britain among the many other countries that signed the treaty. Let me point out the Buenos Aires is the seat of the Antarctic Treaty Secretariat. We are also a pioneer in the exploration of the white continent with many firsts:

    1. Largest number of bases in the Antarctica (13)
    2. Longest established permanent base in the Antarctic – Orcadas (1904)
    3. First Full-Time Church – St. Francis of Assisi (Esperanza)
    4. First country with Families in the Antarctica
    5. First School - Escuela Provincial Nº38
Presidente Raúl Ricardo Alfonsín
    6. First Radio Station - LRA 36 Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel radio station which started transmitting in 1979 on a regular basis.
    7. First person born in the Antarctica: Emilio Marcos Palma (born 7 January 1978) Two others, since.
    8. First Zoned Cemetery – Base San Martin –

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 03:51 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • gordo1

    @20 Hector

    Your totally uninformed and mistaken drivel really is very sad.

    Your statement that ”After the last Spanish Governor to the Falklands, Argentina appointed Luis Vernet as the Governor of the Malvinas (Falklands.) In 10 June 1929, Luis Vernet together with 50 families, raised the Argentine flag in the Falklands“ is, of course, nonsense. ”10 June 1929“ is clearly wrong and the rest of the ”misinformation“ is just plain wishful thinking on your part.
    As I have stated in other threads, Vernet sought and obtained approval and authorisation from the British Consul in Bs As BEFORE departing for the Falkland Islands to set up his business enterprises there under the ”guise” of an appointment by the United Provinces of the River Plate(N.B. NOT yet Argentina) as their Governor.

    You really must do better!

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 08:08 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • golfcronie

    @20
    Your 1-8 first really smacks of COLONIALISM in it's worst form, do you really think that because you have all the above it's yours. Bearing in mind that Antartica is supposed to be for the peoples of the world and not colonised.

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 08:40 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • FitzRoy

    @20: Hektor, are you absolutely sure of your facts? 10 June 1929? I'm pretty certain, erstwhile business man and privateer Vernet was very dead by then.

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 09:56 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Hektor

    FitzRoy:

    Luis Vernet passed away in 1871. Do not take my word for it. The following link is Wikipedia biography on Luis Vernet:

    https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_Vernet

    These are facts posted on this forum. I am sure that all kind of facts will be denied id it doesn't fit the fiction narrative. It seems that if an elephant walks into a room, most members will deny the obvious fact. They will counter that it is not an elephant but a mouse with a glandular problem.

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 12:43 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • gordo1

    @24 Hector

    You do not seem to have realised that in your #20 you stated ”After the last Spanish Governor to the Falklands, Argentina appointed Luis Vernet as the Governor of the Malvinas (Falklands.) In 10 June 1929“. I believe you are 100 years out of date and, furthermore, Argentina did NOT appoint Luis Vernet as Governor. Had any appointment of this nature been made it would have been made by las Provincias Unidas del Rio de la Plata as Argentina didn't exist in 1829!

    Your continuous ”hectoring” continues to confirm that the concept of Argentine sovereignty of the Falkland Islands is lies, myths, fairy stories and mistaken interpretations of historical events. You are just repeating the brainwashing with which you have been treated since a child.
    ¡NABO!

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 02:12 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • darragh

    @24 Hektor

    I suggest you reread, carefully, what Fitzroy wrote at @23 then reread even more carefully what you wrote at @20

    By the way I'm still waiting for your response to my @17

    As for your @20 points 1 to 8, hilarious irrelevancies.

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 02:12 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • gordo01

    @24 Their are two elephants in the room on this particular thread - the first is your apparent inability to substantiate your statements and the second your reluctance to actually acknowledge that you may be wrong.

    We are confident that you are unable to substantiate your statements and we know you are wrong anyway. 1NABISIMO!

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 05:39 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Briton

    @24 Hektor
    today is 2016, and people today have the freedom to choose who they want to govern them , freedom to choose who they wish to associate with , and the freedom to choose who they wish to by,

    in all these cases, the islanders have repeatedly refused to be Argentinian ,

    that is called democracy in the 21st century,

    what century are you quoting from.

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 07:17 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Hektor

    Britton:

    You did not read carefully what I wrote in #11. Let me quote my last paragraph:

    “I am not part of the Argentine government nor do I represent any political faction. Therefore, I can talk frankly. Here is the real present day situation. Argentina has the historical rights and you have possession of the Islands. Period. We are not stupid. We know very well that are not getting the Falklands back. On the other hand, we do not want them for many reasons. All we are interested is in reestablishing economic links and ties with Great Britain and reaching a comprehensive agreement or treaty with the UK regarding the South Atlantic and the Antarctica. In order to do so we have to put everything on the table including our claim to the Falklands. These negotiations are between Argentina and the UK, only.”

    I also wrote in #20 the following:

    “I also tried to convey that historical rights plus $2.00 will get you a cup of coffee. It is all meaningless if you do not have possession of the Islands. This is something that got lost in this forum. Possession is everything, in the real world, and we do not have it.”

    It seems to me that you (most of you) your hearing is very selective. Anything that contradicts your fiction narrative is rejected outright.

    Just in case, “Fiction Narrative” is a political Sciences term meaning the narrative that is not in accordance with the true history of the country. It is done to foment patriotism. Every nation has it, including Great Britain and Argentina.

    Self-Determination” is a double edge sword. What will England do if Scotland opts for independence?

    Sep 23rd, 2016 - 08:44 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Hepatia

    England will return the Malvinas within 25 years.

    Sep 24th, 2016 - 01:29 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Hektor

    Hepatia:

    I don't think that England will return the Malvinas nor do I want them. If that happens, firstly we are facing an insurrection by the Kelpers that will take over the Islands. What do we do then? Sent troops to quell the rebellion? We can't. If we don't send troops and the rebellion succeeds, what precedent we set for the other Argentine provinces?

    Lastly, if we get Malvinas, they will join the Argentine Republic as a Province. In order to get the Islands, we have to give them tremendous benefits that the other provinces do not have. Why should we do when the rest of the provinces stuck with us in the thick of things. Therefore, I do not want them back.

    As I said in a previous message, every country has its own “Fiction Narrative.” The Argentine one is that General Jose de San Martin is the “Father of Argentina.” This was a narrative propelled by Bartolome Mitre, a historian, President of Argentina, and founder of the newspaper La Nacion, among his many accomplishments. Make no mistake, I have the deepest respects for San Martin, but I do not think he is the father of our country. San Martin was a brilliant general and the only Latin American military leader that has his/hers portrait hung in West Point. His battle of Maipu, the one that liberated Chile, is studied by the West Point cadets as an example of a perfect battle.

    Some years ago, I participated in the British Empire Forum. For that forum I wrote an essay regarding the British and San Martin role in the independence of South America from Spain. This essay has been published in the forum as a contribution from one of its members. The following is my link to my essay:

    http://www.britishempire.co.uk/maproom/southamericaandbritish.htm

    The following link is to Wikipedia’s link to the “Maitland Plan:”

    http://www.britishempire.co.uk/maproom/southamericaandbritish.htm

    Sep 24th, 2016 - 03:43 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Don Alberto

    The most “amicable solution” is to accept that the Falkland Islands is a UK BOT and drop the stupid and illegal claim of Argentine sovereignity (illegal according to international law in 1832 through 2016) .

    Sep 24th, 2016 - 05:37 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • lsolde

    Well thank you Hektor for stating that you don't want the Falklands.
    We do want them so it would appear that we agree on something.
    lf your government would then drop its ridiculous “claims” then we could be good neighbours & help you on other issues.
    Regards, I

    Sep 24th, 2016 - 10:09 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Briton

    Hektor
    First you say=
    On the other hand, we do not want them for many reasons. All we are interested is in re-establishing economic links

    then you go on to say=
    agreement or treaty with the UK regarding the South Atlantic and the Antarctica. In order to do so we have to put everything on the table including our claim to the Falklands. These negotiations are between Argentina and the UK, only.”

    But yet again, you fail to tell us why Argentina is entitled to them,
    historically is utter rubbish,
    Every country on the planet can historically claim the planet,

    The facts are, Argentina has never owned the islands , never run them , never administered them , and never controlled them,
    Britain has,

    Argentina has , invaded them , threatened them , abused them , intimidated them , harassed them , and tried to blockade them,
    And you think Argentina should take them by force and against the will of the people,

    Argentina has no claim whatsoever , other than pure greed, and a distraction from her own problems,

    Argentina refuses to accept they exist, therefore abusing there human rights,
    Argentina in this day and age, should be utterly ashamed of them selves,

    When are you indoctrinated people going to listen to the rights of the people that live there,

    They don't want to be Argentina, they don't want to be ruled by you,
    is that so hard to understand,

    Sep 24th, 2016 - 10:33 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @31 Hektor
    You say you don't want the islands, but how many people in Argentina agree with you? There is no point Britain putting much effort into trade or agreements with Argentina when CFK, or some other president hostile to Britain, is likely to be elected in 3 years' time. We've already seen the previous government cancel agreements made by Menem after all.

    Sep 25th, 2016 - 11:57 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • gordo1

    I have never seen here on Mercopress such confused and confusing posts as those presented here by “Hector”! Not only are they confused and confusing but contradictory also. ¡Pobrecito!

    Sep 26th, 2016 - 12:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Briton

    some if not most should just pass him over,,
    its now obviously certain that he must be AXEL MKII.

    Sep 26th, 2016 - 01:08 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • MK8 Torpedo

    @29 Hektor

    If in September 2014 Scotland had voted for independence it would by now or very soon be independent.

    What would England or the UK nothing Scotland would be independent,if the FI had voted to become part of Argentina that's what would have happened.

    Sep 28th, 2016 - 01:14 pm - Link - Report abuse 0

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