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Montevideo, June 20th 2019 - 07:13 UTC

 

 

Venezuela: What will happen today?

Saturday, February 23rd 2019 - 11:00 UTC
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At least 600,000 people are expected to be guided by Guaidó and other legislators who will make the trip to the Colombian-Venezuelan border to try to pass the aid At least 600,000 people are expected to be guided by Guaidó and other legislators who will make the trip to the Colombian-Venezuelan border to try to pass the aid
Guaidó has called it “the greatest mobilization in our history” and has assured that aid “will enter in any way.” Guaidó has called it “the greatest mobilization in our history” and has assured that aid “will enter in any way.”

Venezuela will live a historic day this Saturday, February 23: thousands of people will gather at the borders of the country for a massive mobilization that expects to receive tons of humanitarian aid.

The event is promoted by the declared president in charge of Venezuela, Juan Guaidó, and the countries that support him, headed by the United States, which has sent most of the aid, and Colombia, which has received and stored it.

In the Colombian border city of Cúcuta there is an estimated 600 tons of food, nutritional supplements, medicines and hygiene products. There was host the free concert “Venezuela Aid Live” this Friday, which sought to raise some US $ 100 million more in humanitarian aid and conglomerated more than 160,000 people 300 meters away from the border bridge of Tienditas, which was blocked by forces military officers of Chavez president Nicolás Maduro since mid-February.

Guaidó has called it “the greatest mobilization in our history” and has assured that aid “will enter in any way.”

The event is opposed by Maduro, who denies the humanitarian crisis in his country, the Armed Forces of Venezuela, and the countries that support him, including Cuba and Russia.

At least 600,000 people are expected to be guided by Guaidó and other legislators who will make the trip to the Colombian-Venezuelan border to try to pass the aid.

What will happen this Saturday in Venezuela?

There are three possible scenarios:

-Maduro allows humanitarian aid to enter Venezuela, which is a political victory for Guaidó and the opposition.

-Maduro does not allow aid between and his military and paramilitary forces brutally repress the opposition in another bloodshed.

-A breakdown of the military command line, by which sectors of the Armed Forces emerge, recognizing Guaidó as president and allowing humanitarian aid to enter.

The last thesis is based on the present discontent among the lower strata of the military sector. Venezuelan military specialist and director of the NGO Control Ciudadano (Citizen Control), Rocío San Miguel, says that in January alone there were 4,009 defections recognized by the Bolivarian National Guard (GNB) in an interview with El País.

Between January 23, the day that Guaidó was proclaimed president in charge of Venezuela, until now, there are more than 40 confirmed deaths of protesters in the country.

Next Monday, February 25, the vice president of the United States, Mike Pence, will travel to Colombia to negotiate the departure of Nicolás Maduro from power.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Tarquin Fin

    Think,

    Creo que me querias decir “eramos pocos y parió la gata ...” La verdad que no me lo esperaba, me hiciste reir un rato.

    Te acordas que yo nunca pensé que la Cris había mandado a matar a Nisman? Revisa mis posts y te vas a dar cuenta.

    Por el resto, bueno, por lo menos no terminaste comparandome con Goebbels, :-)

    Chicureo,

    I understand that the scenario you describe is probably the most likely. We too have been gifted with exceptionally talented Venezuelans that have left everything behind and are building a new life. I had the privilege to work with them both in BA and Cordoba.

    Hopefully -and quite aware of how naive my thoughts are right now- Maduro makes some room so things do not take a turn for the worst. I know this is probably just wishful thinking, but I really want to keep my hopes for transparent and fair elections.

    One thing that Marxism always accomplishes is driving away the best talent out of a country.

    Feb 24th, 2019 - 08:42 pm +2
  • Chicureo

    I watched the Live Aid Concert yesterday. It was a surprise seeing Colombian TV broadcast images of Guaido crossing a bridge connecting the two countries on foot, in defiance of a travel ban imposed by Maduro. Juan Guaido was shown being embraced by the presidents of Colombia and Chile.

    Today, all the borders are closed and everyone assumes more violence. History is happening, hopefully for change.

    Feb 23rd, 2019 - 01:08 pm +1
  • Tarquin Fin

    Gents,

    I am hearing from several Venezuelan people I know, that this “situation” will inevitably lead to a bloodshed in the country. They are desperately telling friends and family there to get out before it's too late.

    Is a civil war inevitable in Venezuela? Has outside military intervention become a possibility if “militia” violence breaks out? What is your take on that?

    I think Maduro will ultimately cave in to the pressure and negotiate a kind of soft exit. However that is not what most of the panas in BA feel like.

    Feb 24th, 2019 - 04:29 pm +1
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