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Travelers scrambling to travel to Brazil following visa requirement changes

Saturday, March 30th 2019 - 07:56 UTC
Full article 31 comments

Travelers are scrambling to get plane tickets to Brazil now that the country has erased the need for a visa. Australian, Canadian, Japanese and American tourists will no longer need a visa starting June 17, 2019, and a new Kayak survey revealed searches for flights have shown double-digit increases. Read full article

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  • Jack Bauer

    And the opposition is complaining.....

    Mar 31st, 2019 - 10:38 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @Jack Bauer

    REF: “And the opposition is complaining.....”“

    You are right!

    SUB: ”intending to visit Brazil for leisure and business tourism, artistic or sports activities or exceptional situations of national interest”:

    Under the guise, the Imported-Crooks [as if there is a shortage of a local variety] will definitely enter to hide themselves [+their loot]! South America is - Traditionally - considered to be a perfect temporary/permanent hide-out! So it's natural+normal to make it OFFICIAL!

    Apr 01st, 2019 - 12:58 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    @:o))
    The objective of such measures is having the desired result.....the small amount Brazil loses by no longer requiring a visa to visit Brazil, considering the process was already greatly simplified last year, will be more than compensated by the influx of foreign tourists and businessmen...why carry on with the red-tape ?

    Apr 01st, 2019 - 05:54 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @Jack Bauer


    REF: “why carry on with the red-tape”“

    Right - makes sense but filling the name, passport nº, etc. simple details online within a few minutes to obtain a visa; is not exactly a ”Red-Tape”! And without ANY barrier at all, it may be easier - an encouragement - for the unwanted; to hide [as mentioned above].

    Apr 01st, 2019 - 06:10 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @JB
    Those are countries that require Brazilians to get a visa to visit (I recall you complaining how hard it was to get a US visa), so perhaps the idea was to pressure them to change their policy. It probably hurts Brazil more, though. India has a similar rule; it's ridiculously hard to get a business visa, yet I doubt they have any problem with immigration from Europe.

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 08:20 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DemonTree

    REF: the idea was to pressure them to change their policy

    Not ALL of the policies - political decisions - are based on logical/rational thinking. Pl. look around! They are based on the pursuit of the political agenda of a Party-in-Power.

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 10:08 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    Eh, I think both policies are rational in different ways. If they require visas they can use it as leverage to try and get visa free travel for their own citizens, such as was previously agreed with the EU. But it comes at a cost of reducing tourism to Brazil, and right now that is probably a higher priority.

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 03:20 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    @DT
    Don't recall saying it was 'hard' to get a US visa...perhaps bureaucratic, but that's all. And while it's very unlikely 'tourists' from those countries would come to Brazil to overstay their welcome, and disappear into the crowds, this is what happens with Brazilians in those countries. The fact remains, Brazil has far more to gain by making it easier for tourists to come in, than by demanding a visa.

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 05:37 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “while it's very unlikely 'tourists' from those countries would come to Brazil to overstay their welcome, and disappear into the crowds”

    Don't be too sure. This is what I found on a site for expats in Brazil:

    ”In some cases, those teaching English do so on a tourist visa, and it’s common for language schools to hire teachers this way. Tourist visas are valid for 90 days (they are renewable), and they must be obtained prior to entry in Brazil. Keep in mind that while English teachers use this method to work in Brazil, it is technically not considered legal work and it does come with some risk.”

    When I looked into working in Argentina, I was surprised and slightly shocked to find a site advising travellers from the US etc to simply go there on a tourist visa and get a job. Illegal but apparently not well enforced. Talk about hypocrisy!

    How difficult is it to get a US tourist visa, for the average Brazilian?

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 08:17 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    “Don't be too sure. This is what I found on a site for expats in Brazil:”......
    Ok, this must happen, but hardly in the same proportion as those who go to AUS, CDA, USA.
    Until now, if you didn't have a visa (to get into Brazil) you probably wouldn't even be allowed to embark at the port of departure...airlines don't like having to waste a seat to take them back.
    I can quite agree that hunting for illegals to deport is not one of the priorities of our Federal Police, nor Argentina's.
    For the “average” Brazilian it might not be easy to get a USA visa...if you don't have a job, if you do but don't earn very much, if you don't own property, if you're young and have no one to vouch for you (like parents), if you have a close relative that went / overstayed the welcome, if you are selected to be interviewed at the Consulate and don't pass, you are likely to be refused a visa. That's why many of the poorer Braziilians who are looking for a better life try to sneak over the southern border.

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 10:09 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “Ok, this must happen, but hardly in the same proportion as those who go to AUS, CDA, USA.”

    I'm sure. And if they did, then Brazilians would start demanding the laws be enforced, and throw out anyone who worked on a tourist visa.

    Those US visa requirements are way more onerous than I expected. I can see why you complained now, you may as well be applying for a mortgage! I bet the US is losing just as much tourism money as Brazil, but they probably don't care.

    I was gonna ask why the poor Brazilians don't go work illegally in the UK instead, where they don't need a visa, but apparently plenty do:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21759744

    Apr 02nd, 2019 - 11:04 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @Jack Bauer / @DemonTree

    You mean, the crooks too, from these countries can enter, exist & hide without ANY bureaucracy?

    Besides, in the list of the “Favored Nations”, surprisingly [after so much of hugging+kissing+ass-tapping] 'he' forgot to add ISRAEL:
    http://www.chargeonline.com.br/php/charges/AUTO_sid.jpg

    Apr 03rd, 2019 - 09:58 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    Lol. I don't know if our immigration staff check for criminal records on entry, but one of our more famous crooks spent 30 years in Brazil because we had no extradition treaty: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronnie_Biggs

    Apr 03rd, 2019 - 03:44 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    “And if they did, then Brazilians would start demanding the laws be enforced, and throw out anyone who worked on a tourist visa”..

    That might happen in a civilized country where its laws are enforced....here, no one gives a damn....and those who know some illegal immigrant, aren't going to get involved....

    The US consulate usually demanded a copy of your last income tax return.... a good reference to a person's real situation....After my first two visas (1980, 1990) the next ones were only bureacratic (following the rules) but were always granted without hassle. Was never called up for an interview.

    “I bet the US is losing just as much tourism money as Brazil, but they probably don't care”.
    I wouldn't count on that.....the tourist imbalance, in terms of revenue, favours Brazil, and now, is likely to grow.
    Your link just confirms that Brazilians are pretty efficient at overstaying their welcome.....and if they aren't stopped by being refused a visa, or if CBP / Airport Custom in the US etc don't catch them/ send them back, you can imagine how the numbers of illegal immigrants would rise...
    Biggs was special case....he married a Brazilian woman, had a Brazilian son....but in the
    end, he decided to leave.

    Apr 03rd, 2019 - 07:27 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DemonTree

    REF: “famous crooks spent 30 years in Brazil because we had no extradition treaty”:

    So imagine the nº of not-so-famous Foreign - Imported - Crooks who must ALREADY be hiding in South America [+ those who are welcome without ANY Red-Tape]!

    Apr 03rd, 2019 - 09:12 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @JB
    “here, no one gives a damn”

    Maybe not, but the people in that town near the border did attack the Vz refugees. I think if there were really too many immigrants in Brazil then they'd do something.

    “The US consulate usually demanded a copy of your last income tax return”

    How nosy. I wouldn't want to visit a country that thought it had a right to all those private details. When I went to America I just had to fill in a form on the plane and sign it. The only question I remember is the one about moral turpitude, whatever the heck that is.

    I was surprised to learn there are so many Brazilians in the UK illegally. The tabloids only talk about Muslim immigrants, and Eastern European ones. Perhaps South Americans just don't fit the narrative? I found an interview with one:

    “VICE: What made you want to start a new life in another country?
    Brunna: Brazil isn't safe. The streets are full of danger, and even the schools are dangerous. Some of the kids are very bad. Their families haven't taught them right from wrong or given them any rules to follow. There's a lot of theft and robberies, and also lots of drugs going round at the schools. The wages are also low in Brazil. It isn't a country in which it's easy to earn money.”

    One of the immigrants B thinks has bad intentions?

    As for Biggs, he probably got homesick. But what does the government care if he's married or has a kid? They put their own criminals in jail away from their families, don't they?

    @ :o))
    There used to be a lot of Nazis hiding in South America, too, but they must all be dead by now.

    Apr 03rd, 2019 - 10:21 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DemonTree

    REF: “There used to be a lot of Nazis hiding in South America, too, but they must all be dead by now”:

    THAT, was 70 years ago!

    Thereafter, till today [now on, in the future as well]; there must/will be many [maybe, too many] Imported Crooks frequenting [or eager to frequent] South America.

    Besides, The Famous Red-Tape exists only for the “Normal Tourists”. Those with ulterior motives + sinister plans; can come/go freely [with NO Red-Tape AT ALL]!

    Apr 04th, 2019 - 01:34 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    @ :o))
    “Those with ulterior motives + sinister plans; can come/go freely”

    Probably. Brazil has thousands of miles of borders with nearly every country in South America. Defending it all would be impossible.

    Did any Nazis hide out in Luxembourg?

    @JB
    After rereading my previous post:

    “I wouldn't want to visit a country that thought it had a right to all those private details.”

    Guess this is what those SJWs mean when they talk about privilege. I've always pretty much assumed I could visit any country I wanted (except for ones with evil authoritarian governments like NK and Iran). But no one has a right to enter another country, and for most people in the world, these bureaucratic visas are the reality if they want to travel. (And that's if they're rich enough to even afford it.)

    Apr 04th, 2019 - 04:10 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    The VZ refugees being attacked up in Pacaraima is in no way similar to the hordes from Cental America swarming over the US border. Motivation, on both sides, totally different.

    Re the US visa, income tax return...the information is secure and not going to be used wrongly, so who cares ? I don't. I have nothing to hide.

    The Brazilian immigrant in the UK, described it as it is....don't blame her for leaving.

    “One of the immigrants B thinks has bad intentions?”
    What is B supposed to have said about the Brazilians fleeing from Brazil ? just remember, the exodus of Brazilians grew like hell after Lula & Co got into power ....not B.

    “But what does the government care if he's married or has a kid”....right, or wrong, it's the law. But what the hell does that have to do with separating families when criminals go to prison ? you insist on comparing apples and oranges....doesn't work.

    SJWs ? you can visit any country, provided you fulfil the conditions they impose....which is their right.....and to get a visa, expensive ?? if you can afford to buy an airfare, pay for hotels etc, the cost of a visa is peanuts.....

    Apr 04th, 2019 - 10:54 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DemonTree

    REF: “Probably. Brazil has thousands of miles of borders with nearly every country in South America. Defending it all would be impossible”:

    PROBABLY???

    REF: “Defending it all would be impossible”:

    That's EXACTLY was my point - REF: “Those with ulterior motives + sinister plans; can come/go freely [with NO Red-Tape AT ALL]!”

    REF: “Did any Nazis hide out in Luxembourg?”:

    Yes - just a few - unsuccessfully, though

    Apr 05th, 2019 - 10:58 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “What is B supposed to have said about the Brazilians fleeing from Brazil ?”

    It's what he said about illegal immigrants in America, remember? Who include some 100s of 1000s of Brazilians. Sneaking into another country isn't a great thing to do, but most of them probably left because of violence and the bad economy, same as the Central Americans trying to enter the US. And same for the Venezuelans, except that their problems are quite a few degrees worse. Murder rate in Vz last year was 81.4 per 100,000, El Salvador 51, Honduras 40, Mexico 25.8, Brazil 25. And the Vz economy is in a nose dive. Doesn't make it the US's responsibility to deal with the consequences of violence in Latin America... except they did start the war on drugs, and they are the demand that draws the supply.

    As for visas, the US has pretty lax laws on data protection, though you'd hope the immigration service would be better. And I meant if you're rich enough to afford to travel; if you're not it's kind of irrelevant whether you need a visa. Obviously if you can pay the airfare you can afford the visa, unless you were only planning to visit for a couple of days. I looked into visiting the Igazu falls when I was in Argentina, and would have gone to see the Brazilian side too, but an American wouldn't when they had to pay over $100 for a visa just for one day.

    “you can visit any country, provided you fulfil the conditions they impose”

    I know, and there are plenty I wouldn't visit because I object to their laws. But the SJWs are always saying people have privileges they don't notice and just think it's normal, and I always thought it was mostly bullshit, because eg having a functional family and opportunity for an education isn't a privilege, it's what everyone should have. But in this case, I think they have a point and I spoke exactly like someone who's never had to face that reality. It really is a privilege to be able to travel without everyone assuming you're a would-be illegal immigrant.

    Apr 05th, 2019 - 11:14 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    @DemonTree

    REF: “What is B supposed to have said about the Brazilians fleeing from Brazil?”

    “supposed to have said”:

    BETTER flee before Brazil turns into VENEZUELA! :o))

    Apr 05th, 2019 - 03:39 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    “It's what he said about illegal immigrants in America, remember?”...not really, but if he criticized the fact they try to sneak in, what's the problem ?

    Afaik, the Brazilian exodus started (mainly to the US) in the late 80s, 90s. The succession of economic crises drove 1000s of the lower-middle class to look for perspectives of a better life, to “try their luck”...if they managed to sneak in...(they became dish-washers, house cleaners, gardeners, worked in civil construction, where little or no qualification was required).
    In later years, during the PT era, and mainly from 2011/15, emigration increased by 67% (considering only those who left legally, with no intention of coming back) and this time the emigrants were qualified people, who applied to get in legally and were welcomed - in the US, CDA and AUS. The flow of immigrants is a problem when it becomes uncontrollable and is made up of people who haven't much to offer.

    In 39 years of visting the US, I've never had the slightest problem with 'data protection'....and those that have (?), are probably an insignificant minority. But it's not negotiable, either you accept the conditions or you don't go. Simple.

    After getting to know West Africa, there are very few places there I'd consider going back to...in reality, probably none....not because of their laws, but because of their different cultures, which don't attract me in the least. Back then it was good to make money, but today...

    SJW are hypocrites...if you work and can afford to travel, it's a reward, not a “privilege”...is it at the expense of 'others', less fortunate ? NO.

    “It really is a privilege to be able to travel without everyone assuming you're a would-be illegal immigrant.”.....if you do it the legal way, it's your right. But as those who try to sneak in illegally (not those who get in legally, overstay their welcome and become illegal) are usually those who wouldn't get in legally, they are probably more conspicuous.

    Apr 05th, 2019 - 04:41 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “if he criticized the fact they try to sneak in, what's the problem ?”

    He didn't. That would have been reasonable. He said “the vast majority of potential immigrants do not have good intentions. They do not intend to do the best or do good to the U.S. people.”

    Which is nonsense. The vast majority of potential immigrants just want a better life, where a better life means becoming dish-washers, house cleaners, gardeners, or construction workers, and working hard with no benefits. He could have said that sneaking into another country and breaking the law is a bad thing, or that a lot of immigrants are fleeing violence and he is planning to do something about that. That would have the virtue of being true and not insulting his own people.

    ”emigration increased by 67% and this time the emigrants were qualified people“

    And that's not so good for Brazil, losing qualified people. It's what happened to Venezuela as well. Really anytime immigration or emigration gets too high it can cause problems.

    Data protection problems usually means junk mail, spam emails or nuisance calls. You're lucky if you've never experienced those, though really I doubt they use your data. If you lived in the US it would be different; we did projects with mobile GPS data to track and predict where people would be at a given time of day, and that was quite an invasion of privacy IMO. It would have been seriously illegal if we'd used EU data instead of American.

    ”there are very few places there I'd consider going back to..not because of their laws, but because of their different cultures“

    It's the culture that results in the laws, so not much difference. But you'd go on holiday to plenty of countries, right, just not live there?

    ”SJW are hypocrites”

    How so? A privilege doesn't have to be at the expense of others. It doesn't hurt Brazilians that Canadians can visit the US without a visa, but the individual Canadians did nothing to earn it. You don't get to choose which country you're born in.

    Apr 06th, 2019 - 12:42 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    “He said “the vast majority of potential immigrants don't have good intentions”- Sounds like he was echoing Trumps opinions on the hordes trying to cross the southern border.
    Perhaps most were ‘good’ people, but the few who aren’t, spoil it for the rest.
    Besides, I don’t think the US would benefit by indiscriminately letting in the 10,000 + who tried to force their way over the border. Would simply encourage more to try.
    And whether they’d be good, or not, is not the point…Still think they should have to apply legally…o’wise you are admitting the rule of law means nothing.

    As I’ve said, B doesn’t have the gift of eloquence, which probably leads to his unintentional polemic statements.

    “And that's not so good for Brazil, losing qualified people”…no it’s not, but it’s thanks to the PT etc..

    I get plenty of junk mail, but just delete it or block the source. As for being tracked thru yr mobile phone, the only solution is to keep it turned off most of the time.

    Ok, culture and the laws are closely linked, but since I never had a problem with the law while over there, and had to watch myself regarding their customs, what stood out was the latter. I wouldn't go to some countries, not even on vacation.

    SJWs, imo, for the most part, think they represent others, when in truth they represent themselves...afaic, it's political.
    ”A privilege doesn't have to be at the expense of others”….in terms of travel, (‘n other things, such as being respected) no, IF you have earned it (honestly)...but in the back of my mind was thinking more in terms of the privileges of the political class, which IS at the expense of others. They did nothing to deserve them, and they do hurt the people.
    Rights, or opportunities, on principle, should be the same for all, different to privileges you (can) acquire through life, because you fought for them (like driving a good car, drinking good wine, travelling).
    Worrying, or bitching about where you were born is a bit of a dead end.

    Apr 06th, 2019 - 06:46 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “Sounds like he was echoing Trumps opinions”

    Undoubtedly. I don't the US would benefit from indiscriminately letting in immigrants either, not when the number who'd come is so excessively high. But there's no need to vilify the immigrants themselves to say that, when most just want to escape violence and poverty and seek a better life. Saying they're all bad people makes it easier to justify treating them badly, and that's dangerous.

    And so much the worse for B to say it, when his own citizens are among those who left due to the problems in Brazil. But I suspect his polemic statements do represent his real views; if he had more eloquence he'd just hide/spin them better. What d'you think of the average Brazilian? Lazy or hard working? Law abiding or the reverse? Better or worse than the people representing them in Congress?

    “As for being tracked thru yr mobile phone, the only solution is to keep it turned off most of the time.”

    Far from doing that, most of my friends have signed up to 'Google Stalk' which lets you see each other's locations on the map at all times - and lets Google track you constantly, too. They think I'm odd for refusing to join.

    Re laws vs customs, that's fair enough. Which countries would you refuse to visit?

    “SJWs, imo, for the most part, think they represent others, when in truth they represent themselves”

    That is probably true. But they don't mean politicians' immunity, but things you get but didn't earn yourself, like the opportunity for a good education (either through rich parents or living in a place with good schools). According to them, not being disabled is also a privilege, which is why it seems backwards to me. They should have found a different word to describe the concept.

    And yeah, worrying about where you were born is pointless; for an individual you are dealt a hand and it's up to you to do your best with it. But campaigning/working for eg better education for all or disabled access to public buildings *is* constructive.

    Apr 07th, 2019 - 08:47 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • :o))

    Pl. HOLD-ON! (surprisingly) men-at-“work” - a politician is pretending to be an economist or vice versa:
    https://i1.wp.com/www.humorpolitico.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Paulo-Guedes-meme.png?resize=580%2C388&ssl=1

    Apr 07th, 2019 - 11:12 am - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    “there's no need to vilify the immigrants ...makes it easier to justify treating them badly, 'n that's dangerous”.

    Sounds a bit dramatic...IF people as a whole, really cared what B said, why do they select only what they don't like, to comment on - always criticizing - while conveniently ignoring the rest ? That's extreme bias.

    99,9% of Brazilian emmigrants left Brazil, prior to Bolsonaro....does that not mean anything to you ? While those who started leaving 30 years ago weren't bad people, but the great majority were prepared to break US law to get in.....and now, with it harder to sneak over the border, emigration seems to be concentrated in the social classes who go in legally.

    “...the average Brazilian?”..varies from region to region...although they can't all be labelled as lazy or hard-working, but generally speaking, those from the N & NE are notorious for being lazy, ('n vindictive, dangerous), those from the S & SE are more hard-working...the centre-west region, having been opened up for development quite a bit later than the others, has a big mixture, but considering that those who went there were looking for new opportunities, I'd classify them as hard-working. The Bahiano is synonymous with lazy, to the point of 50 years ago, many multionationals had a policy of not taking them on as factory workers....today, the southern approach to work has probably rubbed off on them. The Brazilian is generally not law-abiding, thinking he's smarter.
    In the South they are probably better. I'd say Congress represents the generally rotten mentality of the people.

    Woudn't visit : Africa (after spending time there) & Middle-East.

    Re SJWs, “..things you get but didn't earn yourself...the opportunity for a good education”
    If your parents worked hard to be able to educate you, it's a their/your reward, but it's unfair to hold it against someone.

    “Campaigning for better education etc”...agree, provided they're truly committed to the cause, to help others.

    Apr 07th, 2019 - 08:27 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “Sounds a bit dramatic”

    Doesn't make any difference what B says, but he was just repeating Trump's line. And Trump can do what the people will let him get away with. He stopped taking children from their parents because it was so unpopular; public opinion matters.

    “99,9% of Brazilian emmigrants left Brazil, prior to Bolsonaro”

    I'm not blaming B for the emigration. He's only been President 3 months anyway, and he was in hospital for half of that. But if I was writing his speeches, I'd have had him say governments in Lat. Am. need to take responsibility for fixing the problems (violence, poor economy) that cause people to leave, and that he was planning to do it. That ought to play well on Fox without pissing off people at home.

    Re Brazilians, must suck being from Bahia if no one wants to give you a job. I wonder if there's a general pattern that people living in colder areas are more hard working? I have a feeling people in the American south are supposed to be more laid back, and it's certainly the stereotype in Europe. I was wondering what B's views might be, and whether he thinks Americans are better, more hard working people? Kinda sad if so.

    ”Woudn't visit : Africa (after spending time there) & Middle-East.“

    The Middle East is where I was thinking of. I'd like to visit Africa though, especially to see the cool wildlife. Would the customs/culture really be much of a problem if just visiting?

    ”If your parents worked hard to be able to educate you, it's a their/your reward”

    Your parents earned it, but it's not something you did for yourself. If you work hard and pass your exams, that is. Even really rich parents can't force their kids to succeed, but they sure can help.

    Apr 07th, 2019 - 11:39 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • Jack Bauer

    DT
    “Public opinion matters”...yes it does, but in many cases the news represents the skewed view of the press....'it' likes to interpret the facts...usually putting the worst possible spin on everything B says...

    If I wrote his speeches, I'd avoid polemic statements, but the problem is when he ad-libs. TBH, he HAS said what what you think he should, but I haven't seen the press make a point of reporting it, unless 'accidentally' when transmiting some footage of him answering questions. Only the 'gaffes' make headlines.

    The Bahianos ('n northeasterners in gen'l) created their own bad reputation...getting into fights, stealing product, etc). My father experienced this when he became General Factory Manager.

    “I wonder if there's a general pattern that people living in colder areas are more hard working?”
    I've thought about this many times....look at Brazil, north & south, respectively usually very hot / quite a bit colder. Not only does cold weather keep you more alert, it demands an extra effort to cope with it. The European immigrants settled mainly in the south.

    “I have a feeling people in the American south are supposed to be more laid back,”...they definitely are, but not to the point of lazy...they are more easy-going.

    I don't think B really thinks the Brazilians are lazy, because on the whole, I'd say the majority are hard workers....the problem is when their 'smartness' tries to cut corners, using their creativity for the wrong things.

    When I first went to WAfrica, the feeling of insecurity was pretty big....felt that if anything happened to me (for ex.,mugged), the authorities wouldn't be overly-concerned. And being white attracted all sorts of looks. I enjoyed the ex-French colonies, where the locals had been better integrated, but even if visiting I wouldn't wander off the beaten track.

    If SJWs think I didn't deserve what my parents offered /gave me - which I took full advantage of - perhaps they should re-think their ideas, their beliefs

    Apr 08th, 2019 - 03:50 pm - Link - Report abuse 0
  • DemonTree

    “'it' likes to interpret the facts...usually putting the worst possible spin on everything B says...”

    So how are they spinning the latest story, that B wants to rewrite history textbooks to describe the dictatorship as a (self-contradictory) 'democratic regime of force'? I thought it was the Left in Latin America that liked to rewrite history, but apparently not.

    Personally I think the problem with B is that he's spent the last 30 years criticising other people (who probably deserved it, but...), he hasn't spent much of that time trying to do anything constructive. Now the expectations have changed radically. Who knows if he'll be able to adapt himself to his new role?

    “The Bahianos created their own bad reputation”

    Still sucks if you are willing to work but get judged by all the others.

    Re climate, I saw someone claiming cold countries were more civilised, but that's bollocks. Many past civilisations were in hot regions, like the Egyptians, Mayans and Aztecs. Even in Europe, civilisation developed first in the south with the Greeks and Romans, and then spread north. So it's a bit of a mystery. I also heard that Southerners in the US got a lot more hardworking after the invention of air conditioning, but that may have been a joke. ;)

    “the problem is when their 'smartness' tries to cut corners, using their creativity for the wrong things.”

    An attitude that's fully reflected in Congress, unfortunately. You didn't ask me the same question about the UK, do you think you know the answer already?

    Africa must have been pretty bad if you felt insecure after already living in Brazil! And sounds like you encountered some kind of racism. Maybe things are better now, but who knows?

    I doubt anything thinks you didn't deserve your education, only that it's an advantage you didn't earn yourself (but did make the most of). It would be easier to accuse me of that, since I put in no effort in until I got to sixth form. It's very hard to learn to work at 16 years old...

    Apr 08th, 2019 - 09:01 pm - Link - Report abuse 0

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