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Journalists organization question Bolsonaro's remarks regarding The Intercept Brazil

Wednesday, July 31st 2019 - 10:53 UTC
Full article 2 comments
CPJ condemned President Bolsonaro's remarks that Glenn Greenwald, the co-founder and editor of The Intercept Brasil, could “do jail time” CPJ condemned President Bolsonaro's remarks that Glenn Greenwald, the co-founder and editor of The Intercept Brasil, could “do jail time”
Bolsonaro also suggested that he had married a Brazilian citizen to avoid deportation Bolsonaro also suggested that he had married a Brazilian citizen to avoid deportation

The Committee to Protect Journalists on Tuesday condemned Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's remarks that Glenn Greenwald, the co-founder and editor of The Intercept Brasil, could “do jail time” and suggesting that he had married a Brazilian citizen to avoid deportation, as reported by a local outlet.

“The latest statements from President Bolsonaro threatening Glenn Greenwald with jail time are an inappropriate and dangerous escalation of the Brazilian government's troubling response to The Intercept Brasil's reporting,” said CPJ Central and South America Program Coordinator Natalie Southwick in New York. “Brazilian authorities must respect journalists' constitutional right to do investigative reporting and hold power to account.”

Beginning on June 9, The Intercept Brasil, an independent investigative news website, published a series of stories based on documents, recordings, and private WhatsApp messages leaked anonymously to the news outlet, which raised ethical and legal questions about the conduct of Brazil's justice minister and a chief prosecutor in the “Operation Car Wash” corruption investigation, prompting Greenwald and other journalists to receive threats, as CPJ reported at the time.

Greenwald has been married to David Miranda, a congressman with the left-wing Socialism and Liberty Party, since 2005, according to Miranda's official webpage.

Categories: Politics, Brazil.

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  • :o))

    The Pro/Con Arguments [valid or otherwise] will end-up in smoke!
    http://rs347.pbsrc.com/albums/p444/drakmacore/20321fycuodflse-1.gif~c200

    Aug 05th, 2019 - 03:57 pm 0
  • Terence Hill

    In 2009, the Supreme Court revoked a dictatorship-era press law that imposed severe restrictions and penalties on journalists, including imprisonment. In a milestone ruling, the Court recognized the freedom of expression, including the right of journalists to publish information of public concern regardless of its origin. “The ruling also reinforced citizens’ right to information, and it has guided the following decisions of the Supreme Court and lower courts,” Taís Gasparian, a Brazilian media attorney and a contributor to Columbia’s Global Freedom of Expression initiative, says. (Among her clients is Folha de S. Paulo, one of the papers that partnered with the Intercept to publish information from the Car Wash leaks.)
    “Confidential information and documents have been leaked to the media before, and the Supreme Court has ruled that it is not up to the press, but to those who possess the information, to protect confidentiality,” Gasparian says. “The press has the right, and I’d say the duty, to publish content that is newsworthy and of public interest.”
    https://www.cjr.org/analysis/the-intercept-greenwald-brazil-soccer.php

    Aug 03rd, 2019 - 02:29 pm -1
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