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Montevideo, May 29th 2024 - 17:17 UTC

 

 

HMS Scott, in four weeks, has record scanned an Atlantic Ocean area similar to that of Portugal

Saturday, August 20th 2022 - 07:50 UTC
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HMS Scott specializes in deep ocean survey work, with the emphasis currently on updating data, charts and the general understanding of the mid-Atlantic (Pic RN) HMS Scott specializes in deep ocean survey work, with the emphasis currently on updating data, charts and the general understanding of the mid-Atlantic (Pic RN)

The Royal Navy survey ship HMS Scott is on course to smash her record scanning the oceans after just the first four weeks of an epic 15-month deployment.

The unique Plymouth-based ship – the fifth largest vessel to fly the White Ensign – has hovered up data covering an area roughly the size of Portugal... or roughly a quarter of the ocean covered during her previous record-breaking patrol.

Scott specializes in deep ocean survey work – reaching parts other vessels cannot – with the emphasis currently on updating data, charts and the general understanding of the mid-Atlantic to assist Royal Navy and NATO operations.

And if surveying an area the size of Portugal in a month sounds (and is) impressive… it’s literally a drop in the (Atlantic) Ocean… a mere 20th of one per cent of the world’s second largest body of water… Or Scott would have to scan another 1,150-plus Portugals to finish the job.

Her crew aren’t that ambitious – but they do intend to break the record 400,000-plus kilometers of Atlantic covered during the 2021-22 survey season.
The ship underwent a £7.5 million revamp in Falmouth to prepare her for her mission, before she sailed in early July. She’s due to return to the UK in the autumn of 2023, although her crew rotate regularly to sustain the long-term operation. 

Alongside the surveying success of the first patrol, the ship’s company were kept busy training to deal with emergencies such as fires and floods on board, culminating in a demanding week of ship-led damage control exercises at the end of the patrol, ranging from minor incidents to major incidents involving multiple fires, floods and casualties. 

After four productive weeks at sea, the ship sailed into Santa Cruz, Tenerife, to swap crew. Scott was the first Royal Navy vessel in more than five years to visit the holiday island, receiving a warm welcome from both Spanish naval and local authorities.

Commanding Officer Commander Tom Harrison called in on the regional naval base commander, Capitan de Fragata D. Pablo Dodero Martinez, to thank our NATO allies for their hospitality. 

The ship also received £4,000 from the Royal Navy and Royal Marines Charity and Rebalancing Lives for teambuilding activities, including a day at Siam Park, Europe’s largest water park, for all aboard and while the engineering and logistics teams enjoyed trips to a go-karting track.

Commander Harrison added: “It’s been a very positive start to the deployment. My crew have really hit the ground running and are working diligently to overcome the many challenges of operating a ship at reach. If we can continue in the same manner, this will be another record breaking effort.” 

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