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Montevideo, June 24th 2024 - 16:33 UTC

 

 

Argentine Foreign Ministry highlights June 10 Malvinas Sovereignty Day

Monday, June 10th 2024 - 19:00 UTC
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On June 10, 1829, Luis Vernet was appointed Governor of the Malvinas Islands in the name of the Province of Buenos Aires On June 10, 1829, Luis Vernet was appointed Governor of the Malvinas Islands in the name of the Province of Buenos Aires

Argentina's Foreign Ministry issued a statement Monday on the 195th anniversary of the establishment of a garrison known as the Political and Military Command in the Falklands/Malvinas Islands in the name of the Province of Buenos Aires. The settlement remained there until it was displaced in 1833 by a stronger British force. The document reviewed Argentina's claims following that event.

”Since then, there has been a sovereignty dispute between the Argentine Republic and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, as recognized by the United Nations General Assembly through resolution 2065 (XX) adopted in 1965. It is for this reason that the United Nations has decided that the way to put an end to the special and particular colonial situation in the question of the Malvinas Islands is the peaceful and negotiated solution of the dispute between both countries,“ the statement read.

”Despite countless invitations from Argentina and the exhortation of the United Nations, the United Kingdom systematically refuses [since 1966] to resume sovereignty negotiations,” the Foreign Ministry stressed.

In November 1973, Argentina passed Law 20561, establishing June 10 as the day to express and reaffirm the sovereignty claim over the Malvinas and other South Atlantic islands. After the 1982 war, the UN General Assembly passed Resolution 37/9, according to which the armed conflict did not resolve the sovereignty dispute.

The United Nations General Assembly recognized the conflict in 1965, calling it an act of colonialism that violates basic human rights, endangers international security, and contradicts Resolution 1514 (1960) regarding countries still holding colonies overseas.

”The international community has reiterated the need to resume bilateral negotiations as soon as possible, which was expressed in 10 resolutions of the General Assembly and in numerous resolutions of the UN Special Committee on Decolonization, as well as in various declarations of regional and multilateral forums, such as the Organization of American States, the Group of 77 and China, the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR), the Ibero-American Summits, the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), among others,“ added Monday's communiqué.

”The Argentine Government wishes to maintain a mature relationship with the United Kingdom, which contemplates a substantive and constructive dialogue on all issues of common interest intending to generate a climate of trust conducive to the resumption of negotiations,“ it went on.

”On this always transcendental date for all Argentines, we reaffirm once again our sovereignty rights over the Malvinas Islands, South Georgia, South Sandwich Islands, and the surrounding maritime areas, as all of them are an integral part of our national territory,“ the Ministry also underlined.

 - The complete release of the Argentine Foreign Ministry on Malvinas Affirmation Day, 10 June 2024

Today marks the 195th anniversary of the creation, by the Government of the Province of Buenos Aires, of the Political and Military Commandancy for the Malvinas Islands and the islands adjacent to Cape Horn.

On 10 June 1829, a Decree was issued which established that: ”The Malvinas Islands and the islands adjacent to Cape Horn in the Atlantic sea shall be governed by a Political and Military Commander to be immediately appointed by the Government of the Republic.” Thus, a government structure was created, the control of which was vested in Luis Vernet, who settled in the islands and publicly exercised his authority and jurisdiction.

Having inherited Spain’s titles by virtue of the succession of States, in accordance with the uti possidetis iuri principle, from the beginning of its independence process in 1810, Argentina continuously exercised its rights over the southern archipelagoes located there.

The first governments of the United Provinces took various administrative steps in which they regarded the Malvinas Islands as an integral part of their territory. On 6 November 1820, Argentine Navy Colonel David Jewett took possession of the Malvinas Islands on behalf of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata and raised the Argentine flag for the first time there. The Argentine Government also enacted legislation and established legal and administrative structures to consolidate the full exercise of its sovereignty, including the promotion of trade activities and the establishment of settlements, which culminated in the creation, on 10 June 1829, of the Political and Military Commandancy for the Malvinas Islands and the islands adjacent to Cape Horn.

However, on 3 January 1833, such effective exercise of sovereignty was interrupted by an act of force carried out in times of peace by the United Kingdom, which illegally occupied the islands and expelled the legitimate Argentine authorities and the existing settlers. This usurpation, which was committed in times of peace and was contrary to the then-applicable international law, disrupted the territorial integrity of Argentina, a situation that was immediately condemned and protested, and to which no Argentine Government has ever consented in over 191 years of history.

Since then, there has been a sovereignty dispute between the Argentine Republic and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, as recognized by the United Nations General Assembly through Resolution 2065 (XX), adopted in 1965. In this regard, the United Nations have declared that the way to bring to an end the special and particular colonial situation present in the Question of the Malvinas Islands is finding a peaceful and negotiated solution to the sovereignty dispute between both countries.

In compliance with this resolution, starting in 1966 and for 16 years, both countries conducted negotiations in order to find a solution to the sovereignty dispute. However, despite Argentina’s countless invitations and the calls made by the United Nations, the United Kingdom has systematically refused to resume sovereignty negotiations.

The international community has, for its part, reiterated the need for the prompt resumption of bilateral negotiations, as stated in 10 resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly and in numerous resolutions of the United Nations Special Committee on Decolonization, as well as in several declarations issued by regional and multilateral forums, such as the Organization of American States, the Group of 77 and China, the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR), the Ibero-American Summits, and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), among others.

On 4 November 1982, a few months after the end of the South Atlantic conflict, the United Nations General Assembly adopted, by an overwhelming majority, Resolution 37/9 stating that the military conflict neither changed the nature of the sovereignty dispute nor solved it.

In this respect, under the First Temporary Provision of the Argentine Constitution—which sets forth that recovering effective exercise of our sovereignty over the Malvinas, South Georgias and South Sandwich Islands and the surrounding maritime and insular areas, in accordance with international law and respecting the way of life of the islanders, is a permanent and unrenounceable goal of the Argentine people—the Argentine Government reiterates its willingness to resume sovereignty negotiations with the United Kingdom and proposes advancing a common agenda on areas and issues of mutual interest. The Argentine Government wishes to maintain a mature relationship with the United Kingdom, including substantive and constructive dialogue on all matters of mutual interest, with a view to creating an environment of trust conducive to the resumption of negotiations.

On this important date for the Argentine people, the Argentine Republic once again reaffirms its sovereignty rights over the Malvinas, South Georgias and South Sandwich Islands and the surrounding maritime areas, as they are an integral part of its national territory.

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  • Little J

    I would think that all the Argentine governments over the last century and especially those in power since the return to democracy, including the present government have far more important matters to look into like inflation, insecurity, and a very long etc. than be concerned by a few islands whose inhabitants don't have the faintest wish of losing their current status and become argentine citizens with all the implications that that move would mean to them.

    Jun 11th, 2024 - 02:15 pm +5
  • Don Alberto

    The statement is a bunch of lies.

    Lie: “Having inherited Spain’s titles” does a robber inherit what has taken at gunpoint?
    In 1816 they stole Spanish lands at gunpoint.

    Lie: “On 6 November 1820, Argentine Navy Colonel David Jewett took possession of the Malvinas Islands on behalf of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata”

    Where in Jewett's report of 1 February 1821 did Jewwtt mention that taking possession of the Falkland Islands?
    Show us: Archivo General de la Nación, Buenos Aires, Marina Corsarios 1820-1831, 10-5-1-3

    The report does not mention of the Falkland Island nor “Malvinas”. The report is in English as Jewett had a very limited knowledge of Spanish. If we are to believe he claimed the islands for the future Argentina, he must have an unusually bad memory as he forgot to mention it.

    In connexion with the signing of the 1825 treaty, Argentine politician and historian Don Ignacio Benito Nuñez issued “Noticias históricas, políticas, y estadísticas de las Provincias Unidas del Río de La Plata, 1825”, a complete list of all territories belonging to Las Provincias Unidas. Nowhere in the document is mentioned Falkland Island nor “Malvinas”

    Lie: “the United Kingdom, which illegally occupied the islands and expelled the legitimate Argentine authorities and the existing settlers.”
    Only the military occupation force and their families were removed. The civilian settlers wanted to stay, except a couple from Brasil and a couple from present day Uruguay, Joaquín Acuña, su mujer Juana and Mateo González, su mujer Marica.

    Documented in: Lista de la tropa, sus familias y peones de la isla de Malvinas - printed in Ernesto J. Fitte: “La agresión Norteamericana”
    https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5053/5533028871_5a2bfae23c_b.jpg
    Photo of first page of the same https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5053/5533028871_5a2bfae23c_b.jpg

    Why do the official Argentina tell these STUPID lies?
    What is a STUPID lie? a lie which is immediately exposed.

    Jun 11th, 2024 - 05:55 pm +5
  • Juan Cervantes

    The whole Malvinas myth is built on a pack of lies.

    Jun 11th, 2024 - 07:19 pm +4
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