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Argentina chairs G-77; CFK demands effective multilateralism

Wednesday, September 29th 2010 - 04:38 UTC
Full article 10 comments
Argentina is overcoming the “sad isolation” inflicted by the 2001 crisis, argued Mrs. Kirchner  Argentina is overcoming the “sad isolation” inflicted by the 2001 crisis, argued Mrs. Kirchner

President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner led on Tuesday in New York the 34th G-77 annual meeting to celebrate Argentina's appointment as the group's chairmanship.

She stated that her country is “filled with pride and responsibility” and highly praised her administration, as well as heavily criticizing the UN Security Council. Previously, she had held a meeting with the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon.

While delivering a speech to celebrate her country's taking over the G-77 United Nations coalitions of developing countries, Mrs. Kirchner assured “the United Nations Security Council needs to set a more consistent system for peace and security goals to be achieved.” Thanks to this statement, she once more claimed for Palestine to be included in the United Nations “as a member-state.”

“The new world panorama has G-77 countries and China as protagonists, however, among multilateral decision systems our countries bear no representation,” she criticized.

The Head of State devoted herself to thank the United Nations for “electing Argentina to be the head of the Group of 77” and stressed that she feels responsible for “bringing the people's voice into the group,” as well as assuring her country was “filled with pride and responsibility for the choice.”

Mrs. Kirchner started her speech by talking about the 2001 crisis that hit the country and highly praised the way in which Argentina came out of it.

Earlier, Argentine Ambassador to the UN, Jorge Argüello, said this appointment would allow for Argentina to provide a clear, necessary role in the arena of international politics.

The diplomat added that the country's new role within the organization would allow for it to overcome “the sad isolation” that had inflicted the country ever since the 2001 economic crisis. “We were the spoilt little country of the IMF,” she said.

“Our country's appointment was supported by all Latin American, African, Asian and Arabic countries. This means that we will be able to fully represent 132 developing countries, and by being part of the G-20 and the G-77, we will be able to address G-8.”

“Argentina's chairmanship in the G-77 will begin in January 2011, the same month in which France becomes chairman of the G8, so we will be able to have a bilateral dialogue with it,” he explained.

He highlighted several international challenges that are expected to be addressed in the international forum, such as climate change, the UN budget, and the fundamental cooperation among states in the Southern Hemisphere.

The diplomat remarked that it was UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon who suggested Argentina should become the chairman country of the G-77, since he believes our country can help find consensus between the G-20 and the developing world.
 

Categories: Economy, Politics, International.

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  • Hoytred

    “ ... Mrs. Kirchner started her speech by talking about the 2001 crisis that hit the country and highly praised the way in which Argentina came out of it....”

    If she's that cocky why doesn't she let the IMF check the figures? It's a strange approach to diplomacy when you slag off the financial organisation that everyone respects and the Security Council which is the only real power within the UN. Way to go Cristina .... make some friends :-)

    Sep 29th, 2010 - 05:08 am 0
  • J.A. Roberts

    Give that woman some more botox! Her trout-pout is starting to sag a bit from an excess of waffling...

    Sep 29th, 2010 - 06:45 am 0
  • Forgetit87

    @Hoytred

    Perhaps because she doesn't want to give undeserved legitimacy to the IMF. Afterall, it was the IMF that provoked that crisis by means of bad advices. No, that “everyone respects” the IMF, is not true. And Argentina, more than most other countries, has every right to despise it.

    Sep 29th, 2010 - 04:04 pm 0
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