MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, January 17th 2022 - 08:00 UTC

 

 

After 5 months patrolling the Falklands, HMS York returns to Portsmouth July

Thursday, June 16th 2011 - 15:28 UTC
Full article 28 comments
The Type 42 destroyer was replenished in the Pacific by Chilean tanker Almirante Montt The Type 42 destroyer was replenished in the Pacific by Chilean tanker Almirante Montt

The Royal Navy’s HMS York on the last leg of her five-month deployment to the South Atlantic on Falkland Islands patrolling is heading for Britain after having shifted oceans to the Pacific.

Her first challenge was a safe transit of the Magellan Strait and Patagonia Canal taking her from the Atlantic to the Pacific. With two Chilean Naval pilots embarked for two-and-a-half days of 'interesting' and 'challenging' navigation, York's Navigator Lieutenant Tim Langford put his extensive planning into practice with extra sailors 'closed up' or posted for the entire passage to critical areas around the ship - the bridge, cable party and steering gear compartment.

For particularly narrow bits there were also extra sailors manning the engine rooms and machinery control room. Meanwhile, for those not closed up, the passage afforded some of the most stunning views known to seafarers on the planet.

And while sailing the canals, Chile celebrated Naval Day, a national holiday commemorating victory at the Battle of Iquique in 1879. With two Chilean pilots aboard it was only right and proper that the event was marked with a winter warmer on the bridge wing with toasts and speeches.

Out in the Pacific and after a week or so at sea the Royal Navy’s fastest destroyer met two Chilean vessels for replenishment at sea (RAS). Chilean tanker Almirante Montt which was simultaneously supplying Almirante Williams - formerly Type 22 frigate HMS Sheffield, also provided HMS York with 350,000 litres of fuel transferred during an 80-minute RAS.

Operational methods within the two navies are similar; the Chilean Navy's modelled to a considerable degree on the Senior Service and many Chilean sailors have experienced Operational Sea Training off Plymouth.

“Recognising that a Type 42 Destroyer needs a regular pit stop, the Chilean Navy was nothing but excellent from the moment the request for this RAS was submitted,” said York's Commanding Officer, Commander Simon Staley.

Next stop for HMS York was Callao in Peru for a four-day break.

On arrival there were the all-important official calls carried out by the captain as he paid courtesy visits to senior Peruvian officers, whose port authority laid on buses for the ship's company so they could move between the harbour and the sights of nearby Lima.

A dozen officers from the Peruvian Naval Academy visited York for a discussion about dealing with the scourge of drug-running at sea.

Exercises complete, York made for Panama and the world famous canal. It takes ten hours to cover the 77 kilometres from the Pacific to the Caribbean, where York emerged and switched to counter-narcotics duties as she made for Kingston, Jamaica.

The destroyer arrived in the Jamaican capital to find tanker RFA Wave Knight, Britain's current counter-narcotics warrior, in port, taking a breather from her search for drug-runners. HMS York then left Kingston in company with RFA Wave Ruler to conduct her last deployment RAS allowing her to top up prior to her final leg homeward.

After stops in Key West, Bermuda and the Azores, the fastest 42 is due in Portsmouth on 8 July 2011. (RN).-
 

Categories: Politics, Falkland Islands.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • stick up your junta

    Peru the Argies great mate
    Chortle chortle......................

    Next stop for HMS York was Callao in Peru for a four-day break.

    On arrival there were the all-important official calls carried out by the
    captain as he paid courtesy visits to senior Peruvian officers, whose port authority laid on buses for the ship's company so they could move between the harbour and the sights of nearby Lima.

    Jun 16th, 2011 - 03:58 pm 0
  • Frank

    Then they passed through Panama..... golly.

    And I thought Argentina decided who could and who could not use the Magellan Straits.
    What a delusional bunch of drop kicks the RGs are....

    sad really init... titter...

    Jun 16th, 2011 - 08:05 pm 0
  • Wireless

    Chilean refuelling, and Naval Pilotage of the Magellan Straight, Peruvian Navy Officers bending over backwards to accommodate a shore leave, and use of the Panama Canal, tut, tut, there we were encircling South America all the time.

    I thought the Navy News carried an excellent story about how the Royal Navy would be getting support and training opportunities on US Navy Carriers preparing them for operating our new Royal Navy Carriers when they are completed. This IS the Special Relationship, seen in operation.

    I also understand the French will also be assisting in a similar fashion, also allowing RN and RAF Pilots to practice landings on their current French Carrier, although the pilots will have learn to speak French. This IS the Defence Cooperation Agreement, seen in operation.

    So much political capital made of a Presidential Signature on a pathetic OAS document, when the reality is so much different.

    The Malvinists should cry in their beers at this point.

    Jun 16th, 2011 - 08:22 pm 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!