MercoPress, en Español

Montevideo, May 17th 2022 - 08:08 UTC

 

 

Yellen says Brexit 'repercussions' would be considered in Fed’s meeting next week

Thursday, June 9th 2016 - 08:50 UTC
Full article 2 comments
Brexit was one factor that the central bank would consider when deciding whether to raise interest rates. The Fed next meets on 14-15 June. Brexit was one factor that the central bank would consider when deciding whether to raise interest rates. The Fed next meets on 14-15 June.
Ms Yellen said “positive economic forces have outweighed the negative”, her strongest indication yet that the Fed will raise rates this boreal summer. Ms Yellen said “positive economic forces have outweighed the negative”, her strongest indication yet that the Fed will raise rates this boreal summer.
The Fed raised interest rates by 0.25 percentage points for the first time in nine years last December and has left them unchanged since. The Fed raised interest rates by 0.25 percentage points for the first time in nine years last December and has left them unchanged since.

United Stated Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen said a UK vote to leave the European Union could have “significant economic repercussions”. In a speech this week, she said a Brexit was one factor that the central bank would consider when deciding whether to raise interest rates. The Fed next meets on 14-15 June.

 Ms Yellen said “positive economic forces have outweighed the negative” - her strongest indication yet that the Fed will raise rates this summer.

“If incoming data are consistent with labor market conditions strengthening and inflation making progress toward our 2% objective, as I expect, further gradual increases in the federal funds rate are likely to be appropriate,” she said.

The Fed raised interest rates by 0.25 percentage points for the first time in nine years last December and has left them unchanged since. It had been widely expected to raise interest rates over the summer, but poor job creation figures for May diminished those expectations.

The US labor market added just 38,000 jobs last month - the fewest since September 2010. Ms Yellen said the May job data was disappointing, but that it was outweighed by mostly positive trends.

“I see good reasons to expect that the positive forces supporting employment growth and higher inflation will continue to outweigh the negative ones. As a result, I expect the economic expansion to continue, with the labor market improving further and GDP growing moderately,” she said.

If the Fed does not increase interest rates at its upcoming meeting, its next opportunity will come in July. That meeting will be held after the EU referendum on 23 June - giving the Fed an opportunity to assess the vote's impact on global markets.

Some economists have warned that a Brexit could adversely impact the US economy. In her speech the Fed chair said: “A UK vote to exit the European Union could have significant economic repercussions.”

She stressed that investors' “appetite for risk” could change quickly and that a UK exit from the EU would be likely to affect market sentiment. Yellen's remarks echo comments from other economists about the impact of a Brexit on the US economy.

Lael Brainard, a member of the Fed's board of governors, suggested that a Brexit could have a “significant adverse reaction” to the US market. “Because international financial markets are tightly linked, an adverse reaction in European financial markets could affect US financial markets, and, through them, real activity in the United States,” Ms Brainard said.

Top Comments

Disclaimer & comment rules
  • Briton

    Ms Yellen
    do your worse and mind your own..

    Jun 09th, 2016 - 07:30 pm 0
  • Englander

    Am sure Remain will win but Leave are doing well and it's going to be a lot closer than I first thought.

    Jun 10th, 2016 - 08:45 am 0
Read all comments

Commenting for this story is now closed.
If you have a Facebook account, become a fan and comment on our Facebook Page!