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Gibraltar talking with Scotland about how to remain in the European Union

Tuesday, June 28th 2016 - 06:16 UTC
Full article 22 comments
“I can imagine a situation where some parts of what is today the member state United Kingdom are stripped out and others remain,” Picardo told Newsnight. “I can imagine a situation where some parts of what is today the member state United Kingdom are stripped out and others remain,” Picardo told Newsnight.
Sturgeon confirmed to the BBC that talks are under way with Gibraltar. Northern Ireland could also potentially be included in the discussions. Sturgeon confirmed to the BBC that talks are under way with Gibraltar. Northern Ireland could also potentially be included in the discussions.
Gibraltar overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to share sovereignty with Spain in a referendum in 2002. Gibraltar overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to share sovereignty with Spain in a referendum in 2002.

Gibraltar is in talks with Scotland about a plan to keep parts of the UK in the EU, according to BBC Newsnight. Fabian Picardo, the territory's chief minister, told the BBC he was speaking to Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, about various options. One possibility under discussion is for Gibraltar and Scotland, which both voted to remain in the EU, to maintain the UK's membership of the bloc.

 Sturgeon confirmed to the BBC that talks are under way with Gibraltar. Northern Ireland could also potentially be included in the discussions.

“I can imagine a situation where some parts of what is today the member state United Kingdom are stripped out and others remain,” Mr Picardo told Newsnight.

“That means that we don't have to apply again for access, we simply remain with the access we have today, and those parts that leave are then given a different sort of access, which is negotiated but not necessarily under Article 50,” he said, referring to a provision in the Lisbon Treaty that sets out how a member state can voluntarily leave the Union.

There is a precedent for such a proposal. Denmark joined what was then the EEC in 1973, the same year as the UK and Ireland. Greenland gained autonomy from Denmark in 1979 and seceded from the EU in 1985, following a referendum three years earlier.

Nicola Sturgeon has previously said that a second referendum on independence for Scotland is “highly likely”, following last Thursday's Leave victory. More than 95% of Gibraltarians voted for Remain on Thursday. The vast majority also want to remain in the UK.

Gibraltar overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to share sovereignty with Spain in a referendum in 2002. Mr Picardo insisted Gibraltar's status as a British Overseas Territory should not mean giving up its membership of the EU.

“The position of the people of Gibraltar is that we've expressed, perhaps even more clearly than the Scots, what our view is going forward, what should happen - that we should continue to have access to the single market to the European Union. My obligation is to protect and promote the interests of Gibraltar and to find such partners who may be willing to do the same thing within the United Kingdom.”

Categories: Economy, Politics, International.

Top Comments

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  • Skip

    Half in half out?

    Probably the most farcical Brexsteria I've heard so far.

    Jun 28th, 2016 - 07:58 am 0
  • LEPRecon

    Mr Picado.

    It's in or out, no half measures.

    But Gibraltar does have a choice. You don't have to abide by the democratic will of the British people. You can vote to become part of Spain or to become independent.

    All your problems solved, right?

    Jun 28th, 2016 - 09:59 am 0
  • Eck

    The Treaty of Utrecht specifically states that in the event that Britain no longer wishes to maintain sovereignty over Gibraltar, then Spain is to have that sovereignty offered in the first place. Hence the reason that Gibraltar wants to remain British. It does not have the option of full independence

    Jun 28th, 2016 - 10:54 am 0
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