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Montevideo, September 22nd 2020 - 17:49 UTC

 

 

Combined exercise, sea, air and infantry landing, in the Falkland Islands

Thursday, July 16th 2020 - 09:32 UTC
Full article 18 comments
As HMS Forth made her way towards Weddell, the RAF’s A400M provided reconnaissance, confirming the route was clear for the ship to dispatch her Pacific 24 sea boats to put the Riflemen ashore. BFSAI As HMS Forth made her way towards Weddell, the RAF’s A400M provided reconnaissance, confirming the route was clear for the ship to dispatch her Pacific 24 sea boats to put the Riflemen ashore. BFSAI

HMS Forth joined the Army and RAF in a combined exercise in one of the islands in the Falklands. After a busy ‘remembrance season’ in the South Atlantic, which saw the patrol ship retrace the route of ships and troops involved in the 1982 conflict, the second-generation River-class vessel knuckled down to more regular military duties.

Every few months all three Services in the Falklands pool their collective resources for a combined exercise. This austral winter, planners’ eyes fell on Weddell, the third largest of the 778 islands which make up the Falklands.

It sits off the west coast of West Falkland about 130 miles from the capital Stanley, is about three times the size of Brighton but home to just 43 souls.

It’s also in private hands so the military received permission from owners before embarking on the exercise. Permission received, embarked Riflemen from A Company, 1st Battalion The Rifles – the latest Army unit to deploy to the Falklands as the ‘Roulemont Infantry Company’.

Forth – and her four sisters – has a dedicated mess deck (bunks, heads, stowage) for more than 50 troops.

As Forth made her way towards Weddell, the RAF’s A400M provided reconnaissance, confirming the route was clear for the ship to dispatch her Pacific 24 sea boats to put the Riflemen ashore.

“The remote location of the island provided an excellent training area for a joint land, air, sea exercise,” said Lieutenant Commander Sam Fields, Forth’s Executive Officer.

The undulating landscape on the island, its size and few inhabitants made for an ideal setting for the Rifles to run-through their section manoeuvres.

Towards the end of the exercise the Typhoons of 1435 Flt could be seen overhead, working with the Riflemen to practice their communication and signaling skills with the jets. Throughout the exercise the Riflemen made use of Forth’s embarked forces accommodation for eat and sleep.

They also tested the ship’s laundry, with Operation Dry-Out – allowing the soldiers to wash, rest, grab hot food, clean their kit – put into effect at the end of the day as the troops filed back on board.

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  • Livepeanuts

    Marxism and fascism are against human nature and by necessity they must fail, the base shields our people from that failure and from prevailing international instability.
    UK must not confuse Argentina Mount Pleasant reassures Argentina.
    This base at Mount Pleasant is not only crucial for the Falklands but also it is crucial for the Western World as China expands its Empire in to the seas.
    A failing Argentina is another risk because the fascist nature of its education, economy and internal policies it requires an “external enemy” to unite that country internally as required by fascist doctrine, the British are one of the cards in the Argentinian nationalist pack. This is the other important reason to keep the base which has given peace to the South Atlantic for so many years next to the coasts of the near, at times, failed state and the instability which it must radiate externally in order for its regime to be able to survive internally as it did in 1982.

    Jul 16th, 2020 - 01:23 pm +5
  • Jack Bauer

    This exercise no doubt ruffled the feathers of the Argy vulture.

    Jul 16th, 2020 - 04:23 pm +3
  • Jack Bauer

    Pugol-H
    “Actually I have never even heard an Argy say it’s in their best interest to be part of Argentina”

    Neither have I.....when I was there in the early 90s, I unfortunately got into a discussion over the Falkland's with some “friends” of my friends....although they were unable to offer even one convincing argument to back their beliefs, they were adamant that the islands belonged to Argentina. They knew nothing of the historical facts, but that didn't matter - they had been taught that at school and that was enough.
    Isn't that what they call 'brainwashing' ?

    But on the good side, some of my familiy members who remained in Argentina after we left (in the 50s), when they hear these nutters ranting about their rights, they just shrug their shoulders.

    Jul 19th, 2020 - 06:55 pm +2
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